"The government came to us first in the form of the Cavalry, then the military fort (which is why we are called Fort Mojave), and finally the boarding school. The government didn’t simply “teach” us English in those boarding schools—they systematically and methodically took our Mojave language. They took all the words we had. They even took our names. Especially, they took our words for the ways we love—in silencing us, they silenced the ways we told each other about our hearts. One result of this: generations of English-speaking natives have never heard I love you from their parents, which in their eyes, meant their parents didn’t love them. However, those parents never said, I love you, because it didn’t mean anything to them—it was an English word for English people. There is no equivalent to it in the Mojave language—the words we have to express our feelings, to show the things berserking in our chests for one another are much too strong to be contained by the English word love."

If What I Mean Is Hummingbird, If What I Mean Is Fall Into My Mouth - The Best American Poetry

This is poet Natalie Diaz on language. Phenomenal.

(via syreetamcfadden) Diaz is blogging all week for the Best American Poetry blog. Get into it.

vintageanchorbooks:

On March 11, 1959, A Raisin in the Sun opened on Broadway. The first Broadway play written by an African-American woman, Lorraine Hansberry, the show was also comprised of a nearly all black cast.
A Raisin in the Sun was nominated for four Tony Awards, and would run for almost two years. It has been adapted and reproduced countless times, and remains one of history’s finest examples of American theater.

vintageanchorbooks:

On March 11, 1959, A Raisin in the Sun opened on Broadway. The first Broadway play written by an African-American woman, Lorraine Hansberry, the show was also comprised of a nearly all black cast.

A Raisin in the Sun was nominated for four Tony Awards, and would run for almost two years. It has been adapted and reproduced countless times, and remains one of history’s finest examples of American theater.

piathabia:

zadie smith. for the win. for the world. (15 zadie smith quotes and essays that will rock your life)

T H I S. 

piathabia:

zadie smith. for the win. for the world. 
(15 zadie smith quotes and essays that will rock your life)

T H I S. 

(via jessehimself)

dynamicafrica:

Black History March Vol. 1: Love is African" photographed by Anthony Bila x The Expressionist.

About the project, in his own words:

My latest offering, “Black History March” is an ongoing project series that seeks to really commemorate & remember various time periods in African history through words, motion picture and still photography. The body of work serves as an ode to black history, each volume of work will speak to a different time period, a different place, different people but all African. Always.

I purposefully launched this project a month after the Black History Month actually occurred, it’s traditionally held in February but I wanted to dispel the notion that black history needs a ‘special month’, the shortest month of all no less, dedicated to it as commemoration and remembrance of the rich incredibly vast history of Africa and it’s peoples. My thoughts about black history are that it should be venerated just as any other significant part of history is, at every given opportunity. The name of the series is a double entendre. March being the month we are in and march in the sense that we soldier on, as a people moving forward but never forgetting to reflect and look back at where we have come from. Something I believe we should all do, regardless.

BLACK HISTORY MARCH
Lest we forget, lest we ever forget
Blood bleeds from our own hands,
Lest we live with regrets, live bitter regret
Blood on the leaves, seeps into the land
Seeds fed on the sweat of black brows
Blood bled from fallen angels on ominous clouds
Graves whitewashed they forgot
But black history marched on
Stained and ingrained in mind from hand
So much we overcame, so few understand
Lynched.
Burned.
Murdered.
Buried and forgotten in shallow graves
Chained and enslaved
A little change makes it all stay the same
New chains, economic new slaves
Graves whitewashed they forgot
But black history kept marching on
Sophisticated slavery & invisible shackles
The war wages on, battle after battle
How will you experience emancipation
When the mansion you lust for,
was built on the damned plantation
Graves whitewashed they forgot
But black history keeps marching on.

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All Africa, All the time.

(via racialicious)

"You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view… Until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it."

— Harper Lee (via hqlines)

(via jessehimself)

beyonce:

The Mrs. Carter Show World Tour 
Manchester 2014
Photo Credit: Robin Harper 


All day. Every Day.

beyonce:

The Mrs. Carter Show World Tour 

Manchester 2014

Photo Credit: Robin Harper 

All day. Every Day.
"I’ve lived in Brooklyn for more than a decade. For the first year, I lived in Flatbush. After Flatbush, I moved to Crown Heights, where I am currently. Lucille Clifton said in an interview once, “children—and humans, everybody—all need both windows and mirrors in their lives: mirrors through which they can see themselves and windows through which they can see the world.” Clifton was talking about race—specifically the disadvantages that come with being white and having only mirrors or being a person of color and having only windows. Because the world is what it is, I’m oftentimes staring out windows. It feels good to come home to Crown Heights, get off the train, and see my reflection."

Brooklyn Poets | Nicole Sealey

This interview is in fact, the business. Get into it.

theworkshopblog:

Kiese Laymon visits with us to talk about race, body, gender, politics, the sentence and time travel on this week’s episode of The Workshop!

nprfreshair:

Architect and freelance illustrator Maja Wrońska  continues to amaze with her beautifully executed watercolor paintings of iconic cityscapes from around the world.

via Colossal

therumpus:

19 Things Women Writers Are Sick Of Hearing by the lovely Saeed Jones, over at Buzzfeed Books.