“Okay, that means if I have you and one other person, I have four-hundred and twelve things in bones alone, and I become an American.” (via fiction: Robert Earle | union station magazine)

from “Citizenship Test” by Robert Earle in current issue of US{M}.

“Okay, that means if I have you and one other person, I have four-hundred and twelve things in bones alone, and I become an American.” (via fiction: Robert Earle | union station magazine)

from “Citizenship Test” by Robert Earle in current issue of US{M}.

(Source: mylifeinohio)

"Blasphemy For Sam Hamill
Let the blasphemy be spoken: poetry can save us, not the way a fisherman pulls the drowning swimmer into his boat, not the way Jesus, between screams, promised life everlasting to the thief crucified beside him on the hill, but salvation nevertheless. Somewhere a convict sobs into a book of poems from the prison library, and I know why his hands are careful not to break the brittle pages."

Blasphemy - NYTimes.com

In the perennial ‘Does Poetry Matter?” ledes, Martin Espada basically just dropped the mic with his response as poem in honor of Sam Hamill.

Suck it, David Orr.

(via PB Everywhere: Bellow – Webcast #1. « PostBourgie)

The liquid brilly (and US{M} issue nO.9 guest editor) Stacia L. Brown (http://stacialbrown.com/) launched a new monthly online reading series, Bellow, featuring writers of color on Wednesday night, introducing us to the work of great writers Joshunda Sanders and Nichole Perkins and a teaser from her novel in progress.

The online Literati grows. And we’re better for it.

(Source: postbourgie.com)

thesmithian:

“It is a literature more about being a citizen of the world—going to Europe, going back to Lagos…we are talking about how the West relates to Africa and it frees writers to create their own worlds. They have several identities and they speak several languages.”

more.

darienreads:

Teaching the Camera To See My Skin

I was 12 years old and paging through a photo album; my memories of the days seemed to fade in the photo’s recreation. In some pictures, I am a mud brown, in others I’m a blue black. Some of the pictures were taken within moments of one another. “You look like charcoal,” someone said, and giggled. I felt insulted, but I didn’t have the words for that yet. I just knew that I didn’t want to be seen as a quality of a dark black that would invite hatred on my skin. 
A year later, it was 1988 and the overhead kitchen light burned the dullest yellow as my mother placed four proofs on the table from an Olan Mills photo session. Each wallet-sized print contained various permutations of my little sister, my mother, father, and me. She wanted to know what we thought.
I considered each of the images. I couldn’t see my face. “Why do I look so dark?”

Read More >

Late pass… but checkout USM’s Syreeta McFadden going in on film bias in color photography. 

darienreads:

Teaching the Camera To See My Skin

I was 12 years old and paging through a photo album; my memories of the days seemed to fade in the photo’s recreation. In some pictures, I am a mud brown, in others I’m a blue black. Some of the pictures were taken within moments of one another. “You look like charcoal,” someone said, and giggled. I felt insulted, but I didn’t have the words for that yet. I just knew that I didn’t want to be seen as a quality of a dark black that would invite hatred on my skin. 


A year later, it was 1988 and the overhead kitchen light burned the dullest yellow as my mother placed four proofs on the table from an Olan Mills photo session. Each wallet-sized print contained various permutations of my little sister, my mother, father, and me. She wanted to know what we thought.

I considered each of the images. I couldn’t see my face. “Why do I look so dark?”

Read More >

Late pass… but checkout USM’s Syreeta McFadden going in on film bias in color photography. 

feverize:

#bronx summer traditions #openhydrants #boogiedown #grandconcourse

summer is here.

feverize:

#bronx summer traditions #openhydrants #boogiedown #grandconcourse

summer is here.

"Years ago, I was performing in an arena in Osaka, Japan, an arena filled with approximately 25,000 Japanese businessmen. (Long story.) While I stood there, I saw the face of my father and I thought to myself, “Daddy, look at this. Look at all these people. Look how their faces are turned up, how they’re waiting for me to say something. Waiting. For me.”"

- Patricia Smith talks with Jon Sands in “The Conversation” from Issue nO.7.

Oh how our faces are still turned up, waiting for you to dazzle us with your work Patricia Smith!!!

Happy Birthday! 

(Source: unionstationmag.com)

On our radar.

"Roxane Gay, author of “An Untamed State” (Grove Atlantic), co-editor of PANK, and essays editor for The Rumpus, was in Los Angeles recently, and she stopped to talk to The Working Poet Radio Show before her reading at Skylight Books. Listen to Roxane discuss her “An Untamed State,” Channing Tatum, and why she is so fascinated with stories about survival. If you liked this podcast, you might also enjoy our interviews with Daniel Halpern, editor of Ecco Press, or Richard Blanco. Thanks to the Los Angeles Public Library."

Roxane Gay on “An Untamed State,” Bad Feminism, Work, BuzzFeed, Survival, Channing Tatum, and More | The Working Poet Radio Show (via roxanegay)

We all here are big fans of Roxane Gay! This is super cool.

(via roxanegay)